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Post Office honors anniversary of Emancipation Proclamation limited-edition stamp

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Postal Service is commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, which President Abraham Lincoln signed on Jan. 1, 1863, with a 2013 stamp. To celebrate this milestone, the Postal Service introduced a limited-edition Forever Stamp at The National Archives in Washington, D.C., which houses the historic document.

The Emancipation Proclamation Forever Stamp is now on sale at post offices nationwide.The Emancipation Proclamation Forever Stamp represents freedom and is the first in a series of three civil rights stamps to be released in 2013. The remaining stamps in the series, to be issued later this year, mark enduring moments of courage and equality in the civil rights movement by featuring Rosa Parks and the March on Washington.

“Stamps often tap into our culture and help us remember the events and people who have had an impact on American history,” said Deputy Postmaster General Ronald A. Stroman. “The Emancipation Proclamation was a powerful symbol of President Lincoln’s determination to end the war, to end slavery and to reconstruct the economy of the country without slave labor.”

The Emancipation Proclamation stamp is the latest stamp to be issued by the Postal Service in tribute to civil rights events or leaders. In 2009, the organization released stamps featuring 12 civil rights pioneers including Mary Church Terrell and Mary White Ovington, and every year it commemorates notable leaders and cultural milestones through other stamp collections such as the Black Heritage series and the American Treasures series.

On Aug.16, 1963, the Postal Service issued a stamp commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The stamp was designed by George Olden, who was the first African American to design a U.S. postage stamp.

The Emancipation Proclamation stamp was designed by renowned graphic designer Gail Anderson, who partnered with art director Antonio Alcalá. It prominently features the phrase, “Henceforward Shall Be Free,” which is taken from the historic document. It also notes Abraham Lincoln’s name and the year the Emancipation Proclamation was signed.

For more information, visit www.usps.com/stamps

 

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